Port-Louis (4)

<<< Port-Louis (3)

 

 

Port-Louis (5) >>>

4 réponses à “Port-Louis (4)

  1. Siganus Sutor

    À tout hasard, et à toutes fins utiles ou inutiles, ce type de pont ajouré dont les éléments encastrés les uns dans les autres sont uniquement verticaux et horizontaux s’appelle un pont (ou une poutre) Vierendeel, du nom d’un ingénieur belge. L’ouvrage d’art enjambant ici le ruisseau du Pouce dans l’axe de la rue Desroches (on le voit mieux sur cette photo) doit être âgé d’au moins un demi-siècle. Peut-être a-t-il été terminé avant la mort d’Arthur Vierendeel (novembre 1940) ?

  2. Oh no kidding, so it is! A teeny weeny Vierendeel – in English – truss. Is it called a beam in French? I seem to remember it’s not really a truss, but I’ve forgotten the details. Recently some cool architects have been designing buildings that are held up by parallel Vierendeel trusses, and they have a depth that is the floor-to-floor height of the building, making it in effect column-free. I don’t know why this isn’t done more often, but maybe it’s a cost thing.

  3. In French a beam is une poutre. But in Martian a beam is un beam (maybe I should write it un bim since it is pronounced with a short i-). The Vierendeel beam is not really a truss, or a lattice beam, as it doesn’t have diagonal members. A truss could work with members purely in tension or in compression and each junction can be pinned. It is not the case for the Vierendeel, with its parallel members which need to work in bending and which need to have fixed connections.

    buildings that are held up by parallel Vierendeel trusses, and they have a depth that is the floor-to-floor height of the building, making it in effect column-free

    I suppose the vertical elements between the floors are on top of each other, no? (Do you have a photo somewhere?) In effect this would amount to columns, which would need to be sized accordingly.

  4. Sorry I took so long to get back to this, I forgot. Here’s one that Rem Koolhaas of OMA in the Netherlands did at Cornell. It’s not exactly what I was talking about, although Rem Koolhaas is the architect who’s always talking about Vierendeels. In this one they’ve got a pair Vierendeel trusses, and in order to provide enormous cantilevers these turn into proper trusses at the ends – well, watch the video. Here’s what Rem calls his « Vierendeel concept ». It’s a bit dry, it’s written in architect speak. Apparently he got it all from Cecil Balmond, who works for some firm called Arup. You may have heard of him.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s