Chemical graffiti

Those who made this graffiti* knew a few things about chemistry. Were they about to become chemists or doctors? Given the amount of broken glass inside the bus stop, they seemed to enjoy some liquids in any case.
 
 
* according to Wikipedia it is supposed to be graffito when singular, which sounds ridiculous to me

 
_______

Graffiti passés (1)
Graffiti passés (2)

About these ads

54 réponses à “Chemical graffiti

  1. Siganus K.

    Given the amount of broken glass inside the bus stop, they seemed to enjoy some liquids in any case

    Maybe they were part of an aromatic ring in which the ringleader liked to smash empty bottles.

    But would this “SSR” be a chemical compound?

  2. A. J. P. Crown

    which sounds ridiculous to me

    It is. Ignore it.

  3. Selon j’ai lu, le mot “graffiti” est vraiment un anglicisme emprunté à l’italien. À mon avis, au moins dans les cas du français et l’espagnol, ce mot a été francisé et «hispanisé» (comme «grafiti », un seul t ; d’ailleurs, «grafito»). Bien que soit un pluriel en italien, pour nous on peut l’employer comme singulier et, avec l’adition d’un «s» comme pluriel ; c’est un cas pareil au mot «spaghetti».
    P.S.
    Dans LSP on a parlé de ce sujet dans le billet « tag ou bombage ».

  4. Siganus K.

    It is (ridiculous). Ignore it.

    But it’s also written like this in the Collins dictionary!

  5. Graffiti, like the names of pasta types (spaghetti, linguini, tortelloni) is a mass noun in English, like water, time, wheat. As such, they take singular agreement grammatically, but are semantically neither singular nor plural. One speaks not of one graffito or two graffiti, but of some graffiti, more graffiti, or less graffiti.

    Consequently, this graffiti is unnatural: one would speak of this drawing, or this inscription, or some such expression employing a count noun, whereas one could and would refer to all the inscriptions collectively as graffiti. Alternatively, one could introduce a classifier (as they are called in reference to Chinese and Japanese and other languages) and say this piece of graffiti.

    In these languages, all nouns are mass nouns, and therefore no morphological distinctions between singular and plural exist. In order to use a number or demonstrative before a noun, one must invariably introduce a classifier. In Chinese, yí rén ‘one person’ is ungrammatical; one must say yí ge rén, which means ‘one person’ but is very literally ‘one piece of human[ity]‘. The standard or normal classifier to be applied to a noun is a linguistic fact about that noun, analogous to its gender in French, and should be in dictionaries (but isn’t). Of course other classifiers are possible, analogous to English one [individual] apple, one piece of apple, one kilo of apples, one barrel of apples, etc.

  6. A. J. P. Crown

    But it’s also written like this in the Collins dictionary.

    This is not the first time this Mr Collins guy has contradicted me. He just doesn’t like me. Anyway, J.C. – John Cowan, not Jesús – is right.

  7. >Siganus K.
    “…they seemed to enjoy some liquids in any case.”
    Il semble qu’ils ont bu quelque boisson spiritueuse mais j’espère qu’il sera un alcool diffèrent de l’aromatique du graffiti. Pourtant, s’ils ont fumé du tabac, un peu de phenol auraient assimilé.
    Si on ne pense pas à la Chimie, c’est clair que les adjectifs «spiritueux» et «aromatique» peuvent être employés pour les deux alcools.

    >A.J. Crown
    Yes, I am not who said: I am the way, the truth and the life.

  8. Jesús, I always disliked my (real) name, which is Jeremy, because other kids made fun of it when I was young. It must have been difficult being Jesús, or is it just Anglos who think that? (Please answer in French or Spanish, if you feel like it.)

  9. >A.J.P. Crown
    (I’ll try to express myself in English.)
    The citation of the gospel was a joke. Jesús María (Mary) is actually my name and, obviously, it is Jesus in English or Jésus in French. Here is a common name so I don’t have any problem with that. Last summer in England a waitress, very surprised after reading my identity card, asked me: “Is your name Jesus?” Really nobody was more surprised than me.
    What does Anglos mean?

  10. A. J. P. Crown

    Anglos = anglo saxons. Not literally; in the USA it’s a way to refer to people whose first language is English rather than Spanish. So I thought that although Jesús would be a very unusual name in England and I know that isn’t so in Spanish speaking countries, I still wasn’t sure if people ever made jokes about it. I suppose it’s similar to Mary or Maria in English, though. Not remarkable at all.

  11. Anglo is short for anglophone, which in English may mean 1) one who speaks English, or 2) one who speaks English as a native language, or 3) one who speaks only English. All three of which, alas, describe me….

    In parts of the U.S. where there are many hispanophones, the name Jesús is kept entirely separate from the native name Jesus, which is applied only to the Savior. In writing, the acute accent may or may not be retained. The pronunciation, however, is adapted to English speech habits, most often in the form [heɪˈzus], where the initial j is assimilated to the sound of English h and the first s, as is normal in English between vowels, to the sound of English or French z.

    By contrast, other Spanish names may be similarly adapted or may be fully "translated". Tomás, for example may remain essentially unchanged or become Thomas in English, with initial stress. Angél, which is not a usual name in English, may go one of three ways: minimally adapted like Jesús, or pronounced like English angel, or retaining its final stress and Romance a, but adopting an English/French/Portuguese pronunciation of the g. Only when my upstairs neighbor, who was called Jack by everyone, died the other day did I find out that his name was Jaimé: since Jack is hypocoristic for John and not James, this was surprising. On the other hand, the name Diego remains unchanged and does not become James.

  12. marie-lucie

    In France or Canada too, nobody calls their child Jesus, the name is reserved for "The One". People unfamiliar with the Spanish custom are very surprised to encounter a real-life person named "Jesus" (and some might be shocked as it might seem to them to be equivalent to "taking the Lord’s name in vain"). But for feminine names, the local equivalent of Mary is probably the most common name in countries of the Christian tradition (the mother of Jesus being the best person to appeal to him in favour of those who bear her own name).

  13. Siganus K.

    AJP: Anyway, J.C. – John Cowan, not Jesús – is right.

    I’m sure they both are. But to me that’s more theory than real life. I would expect most people to say “F…! somebody drew a graffiti on the gate last night!”, and I wouldn’t consider that to be a language error. Whether graffiti is plural or not in Italian doesn’t change anything, because once language A has borrowed a word from language B, it should normally follow the rules of language A, unless custom decides otherwise. “This graffiti” gives you 53000 Google hits and even if all this is plain wrong, the fact that a large number of people are using it this way cannot count for nothing. In some sense it is like the subjunctive after “après que”: we just need to accept it.

  14. Anglos = anglo saxons. This is used mostly by Hispanics or people who are bilingual. Some English speaking people may find it offensive.

    the mother of Jesus being the best person to appeal to himThis is more true of the Roman Catholic tradition. Some protestant Christians would consider this to be "praying to Mary", a violation of the commandment to "have no other gods before me", and therefore very shocking.

    somebody drew a graffiti Never. I would say "someone drew graffiti", or "someone drew some graffiti". I would also say "some water", "some sand", " some cookies", but not "a water" or "a sand". "A cookie" would be just fine.

  15. “The mother of Jesus being the best person to appeal to him.” Don’t forget my wife! I add.
    Facile, although I’m not an Anglo.

  16. I always disliked my (real) name, which is Jeremy,

    AJP, I wonder why children made fun of that name. Something about Beatrix Potter?

    I know a woman named Jeremy. She is my mother-in-law’s half sister and (funny — his name came up just the other day) a granddaughter of Condé Nast.

  17. marie-lucie

    Nijma: praying to Mary: in the Catholic church there are hundred of saints, who can be prayed to. Prayed to, not worshipped as gods. There is a difference.

  18. m-l: Shocking! The only saints we have (or need) are our grandmothers, although I do have an uncle with uncanny skilz when it comes to praying for rain. Sometimes I envy the Hindu tradition, since they seem to have a god for anything you might need a hand with (although the destructive ones are a little hard to understand).

  19. Siganus K.

    Since the universe goes through cycles, you need destruction prior to creation. (Funnily enough, this idea of recycling has finally become very much ingrained in today’s world.)

    somebody drew a graffiti – Never. I would say « someone drew graffiti », or « someone drew some graffiti ».

    Really, you would say “someone drew graffiti” to talk about just one inscription? I wouldn’t. But I am probably being influenced by French, in which “un graffiti” is commonly used:

    "A l’entrée des chantiers, un graffiti donne tout de suite le ton, en lettres orange vif, sur un mur blanc" — France Info, 18 février 2010.

    "On repère, sur le mur rose, un graffiti dont le sens nous échappe de prime abord : “Et si votre fils était hétérosexuel ?”." — Le Nouvel Observateur, 9 mars 2010.

    "Jimenez sait capter la palpitation, le dernier souffle d’un mur, ou sa seconde vie comme espace d’expression libre, car ses murs ont la parole, celle d’un graffiti ou d’un tag." — La Dépêche, 8 mars 2010.

  20. Comme marie-lucie a dit, l’Église catholique parle de prier aux saints comme intercession devant Dieu. Il y a une distinction très claire dans l’argot chrétien à ce sujet entre vénération et adoration donc on différencie le culte de dulie (les saints), hyperdulie (Marie) et latrie (Dieu). Tout au long de l’histoire même la représentation des saints a changé ayant été interdite parfois. Certes, le poison et le «chrismon» sont véritables graffitis pour symboliser Jésus-Christ.
    Chez nous la plupart des prénoms sont bibliques par des raisons historiques ; d’ailleurs, pendant le franquisme il y avait une interdiction de noms «bizarres» à ce sujet. En plus de l’anniversaire, plusieurs personnes fêtent aussi le jour de la fête du saint de leur prénom.
    Comme curiosité j’ajoute le commencement d’une prière adressée à Thadée. Comme vous savez, ce saint a pour prénom Judas et nous disons «Judas Tadeo» pour lui et «Judas Iscariote» pour celui qui a livré Jésus. Selon quelques-uns, le prénom commun a fait que ce saint soit le «grand oublié» du canon :
    « Oh glorioso Apóstol San Judas Tadeo, siervo fiel y amigo de Jesús, el nombre del traidor ha sido causa de que fueses olvidado de muchos, pero la Iglesia te honra y…”,

    >John Cowan
    Comme vous savez, le «coupable» des prénoms : «Santiago, Jaime, Jacobo, et Diego» est saint Jacques :
    http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacobo
    Il semble que jadis les «Santiago» étaient «Tiago» seulement.

    D’autre part, en ce qui concerne les «mass nouns», bien que pour un Espagnol soit un concept difficile à entendre, pour des mots comme «water», «time» ou même «spaghetti» est clair mais pour «graffiti» (une phrase est le plus habituel) cela me semble bizarre. De toute façon, de ce que vous avez écrit je n’en doute pas

  21. marie-lucie

    Jesús: le poison et le «chrismon»

    Vous voulez dire "le poisson" (el pescado) et non "le poison" (el veneno).

    Qu’est-ce que c’est que le «chrismon»?

    JC: Angél, … retaining its final stress

    I am not familiar with that pronunciation as opposed to the common word angel or the name "Miguel Angel" where the stress is on the a, as also in "Los Angeles" (in Spanish).

    Diego: I was not aware that this was another form of the "Tiago" in "Santiago" (Santo Iago, not San Tiago). The word is far too different from "James" to be equated with it.

  22. >Marie-lucie
    Pour «Jaime» on parle d’une variante dialectale (Jacomus) du latin et pour «Diego», dans le lien que vous avez lu et dans autres, il y a qui dit que c’est tiré du grec «didacmos ou didachos».
    Et oui, le poison n’est pas bon même pas pour l’homéopathie.

  23. A. J. P. Crown

    AJP, I wonder why children made fun of that name. Something about Beatrix Potter?

    Yes, there’s Mr Jeremy Fisher, a frog with a tale; but mostly it was because Jeremy was quite an unusual name when I was young, and you don’t want to stand out as a small child. Then there were my awful cousins, who called me "germ-y Jeremy".

  24. A. J. P. Crown

    I think I’ve never heard of a woman called Jeremy before.

  25. marie-lucie

    Jesus: merci pour le "chrismon". J’ai souvent vu ce monogramme, mais je ne savais pas qu’il avait un nom à lui.

    Jaime, Jacques, James, etc

    Oui, il y a eu deux variantes en Latin, la principale en -b- ou -p- (qui reflète le nom hébreu originel, "Jacob") et une deuxième en -m-. Selon les langues et dialectes, le nom s’est encore différencié au cours des siècles. Il n’y a qu’en italien que toutes les consonnes sont restées (dans "Iacopo" et "Giacomo"). Dans les autres langues on a cessé de prononcer la deuxième ou la troisième consonne. Dans "Santiago" il y a "Iago", qui commence comme l’italien "Iacopo". "Jacques" et "Iago" ont tous deux perdu la troisième consonne (-b- ou -m-) du nom originel, tandis que "James" et "Jaime" ont perdu la deuxième. En français il y a eu les deux: l’anglais "James" est en fait l’une des deux formes anciennement prises par le nom en français, concurremment avec "Jacques" (dans Shakespeare il y a un personnage nommé "Jaques", ce qui montre que cette forme était aussi utilisée à l’époque où le français était beaucoup parlé en Angleterre).

  26. marie-lucie

    a woman called Jeremy

    Little by little, English masculine names (especially those ending in the "short" i sound) are being used for girls. The opposite is rarely true.

  27. >A.J.P. Crown
    Neither do I. It’s true that “prophet” is for masculine and feminine but you can see this major prophet painted by Michelangelo as a man with a beard*:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremiah
    *OK, my second name is “María” and I am nearly a beardless man (I didn’t dare write “youth”).

  28. >Marie-lucie
    Depuis que le “chrismon” a été élu pour le «labarum» (en espagnol, «lábaro») de Constantin, il a laissé d’être un graffiti et tout a trop changé :
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labarum

  29. I remember reading somewhere that Diago/Diego is in fact a pre-Roman name quite unconnected with Jacobus/Jacomus, and only associated with it later. Similarly, the Irish name Éoghan, from which my nameCowan < the patronymic (Ma)c Éoghain is ultimately derived, is of pagan origin. I presume it’s connected with éo</i 'yew, Taxus baccata‘, as in the Irish county Maigh Éo > Mayo from which in fact my ancestors came. Later, it similarly became identified with Johannes from which my other name John is of course derived.

  30. A. J. P. Crown

    Jeremiah was another name I got called a lot as a child. I didn’t enjoy it, it was too unusual. I wanted to be called Steve.

  31. In my student days I knew a guy named Jonathan who was rather fussy about his name. He didn’t mind if people called him Jon as long as they knew that this was unrelated to the more common name John (which is pronounced exactly the same). He tried spelling the nickname Jon’n to emphasize this.

  32. marie-lucie

    JC: I remember reading somewhere that Diago/Diego is in fact a pre-Roman name quite unconnected with Jacobus/Jacomus, and only associated with it later

    It makes sense that Diego is unconnected with Jacobus. All of the other versions of Jacobus still have an a. Diago must be a hybrid form influenced by Tiago, a mistaken interpretation of Santiago as San Tiago instead of Sant(o) Iago.

  33. Really, you would say “someone drew graffiti” to talk about just one inscription?
    I would probably say someone "wrote" graffiti. But yes, the -i ending has a sort of Latin sound and we know -i is a singular ending and -um is a plural ending, so graffiti has a plural sound to it.

    Since the universe goes through cycles, you need destruction prior to creation.
    Everybody is in favor of recycling, but nobody want it applied to them.

  34. no, no the other way around. -i is plural and -um is singular. Data/datum. Illegitimi non carborundum. Illuminatus/illuminati.

  35. Nij, even I know that when the Latin plural is -i the singular is -us, not -um. Singular -um goes with plural -a. You gave an example yourself.

    But graffiti is an Italian plura, not Latin, so neither -um nor -us but rather -o.

    Or rather it was an Italian plural. Now it’s an English noun of the kind that doesn’t have a singular plural.

    There is lots of graffiti around here. There is lots of garbage around here. There is lots of artwork around here. (Not here is a garbage, but here is some garbage. Not pick up all of those garbages, but pick up all of that garbage. Not here is a graffito, but here is some graffiti. Not scrub off all of those graffiti, but scrub off all of that graffiti.)

    It’s the same with spaghetti. Nobody says "these spaghetti" and certainly not "a spaghetto", even if that is how it is or was in Italian.

  36. (html tags fixed)

    Nij, even I know that when the Latin plural is -i the singular is -us, not -um. Singular -um goes with plural -a. You gave an example yourself.

    But graffiti is an Italian plural, not Latin, so neither -um nor -us but rather -o.

    Or rather it was an Italian plural. Now it’s an English noun of the kind that doesn’t have a singular plural.

    There is lots of graffiti around here. There is lots of garbage around here. There is lots of artwork around here. (Not here is a garbage, but here is some garbage. Not pick up all of those garbages, but pick up all of that garbage. Not here is a graffito, but here is some graffiti. Not scrub off all of those graffiti, but scrub off all of that graffiti.)

    It’s the same with spaghetti. Nobody says "these spaghetti" and certainly not "a spaghetto", even if that is how it is or was in Italian.

  37. Pour l’embrouiller un peu ou, pour mieux dire, gribouiller sur le sujet :
    -Graffiti (pluriel) et graffito (singulier), en italien.
    -Graffiti comme «mass noun» en anglais (si bien, comme Siganus nous a dit, le Collins parle aussi de graffito (singulier)).
    -Graffiti (singulier et pluriel), et aussi graffitis (pluriel), en français, mais c’est emprunté à l’anglais, malgré l’italien caché, donc un anglicisme mais francisé*.
    -Grafiti (singulier et pluriel), grafito (singulier ; très peu usité) et grafitis (pluriel), en espagnol, mais aussi emprunté au anglais mais hispanisé.
    Pour profiter le latin et ses déclinations, desquelles Nijma et empty ont parlé, y-a-t-il pour «curriculum vitae» une forme au pluriel en français, ou est-ce une expression invariable ? En espagnol on l’emploie aussi et elle est invariable, c’est-à-dire, on l’a hispanisée ; pourtant, on ne peut pas écrire «curricula», comme j’ai lu parfois (hypercorrection pédantesque, à mon avis), pour le pluriel. D’ailleurs, nous avons «currículo» et, son pluriel «currículos».
    Le mot «album» a une histoire pareille à celle de curriculum dans les deux langues ; pourtant, on peut lire «albums» en français, et en espagnol, le pluriel d’«álbum», « álbumes » (un peu loin du latin attendu), est accepté.

    * C’est curieux que ce mot italien, selon le TLFi, soit dérivé de «grafio» (stylet), du latin «graphium». Pourtant, selon le dico cité, le mot français «stylographe» est emprunté à l’anglais «stylograph», dérivé de «style» (poinçon, comme le stylet) à l’aide de l’élément –graph correspondant au français –graphe. Le «grafio» italien, rien à voir avec le «grapho» latin tiré du «grafo»** grec ? C’est vrai que, pour les Italiens, le stylo à bille est une «penna a sfera» (plume avec sphère) ; le «grafiografo», par exemple, sonnerait très bizarre. Comme il y a longtemps j’avais raconté, les champions en ce qui concerne cette «machine à écrire» de poche sont les Mexicains et leur «pluma atómica» (plume atomique !!!)

    **Bon, avec la graphie grecque.

  38. Alors, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolan, «Chacha», est SSR, non ?
    Donc peu de chimie, au moins entre SSR et Downing Street.
    >Linus Asiaticus Magnus
    Merci pour la piste.

  39. Siganus K.

    > Linus Asiaticus Magnus
    Merci pour la piste.

    C’est curieux, hier soir il m’avait bien semblé voir 2 commentaires signés “Linus Asiaticus Magnus” et aujourd’hui il n’en reste plus qu’un, dans le billet “My motherland”…

    Alors, Sir Seewoosagur Ramgoolam*, «Chacha», est SSR, non ?

    Oui, et il existe le “SSR Medical College” de Belle-Rive dans lequel étudient ceux qui veulent devenir médecins. Le graffiti “SSR” apparaissant au fronton du bus stop pourrait suggérer que ce sont des étudiants de cette institution qui sont à l’origine de ces inscriptions — à moins qu’il s’agisse de gens cherchant à orienter le public dans cette direction. C’est pour cela que plus haut je parlais de “doctors” et de “chemists”.

    Quand j’apprenais l’anglais à l’école, on nous avait enseigné que “le pharmacien” était “the chemist”. Or de nos jours à Maurice les pharmacies dont l’enseigne est en anglais s’appellent elles-mêmes “pharmacy”, dans laquelle officie un “pharmacist” et non un “chemist”.
     
     
     
    * de goolam, serviteur (servant)

  40. Je n’ai lu qu’un com de Linus Asiaticus Magnus dans «My motherland».
    Et «chemist» est chimiste aussi, non ?

    Je profite le com de MiniPhasme dans le billet cité, vu que vous ne l’avez démenti, pour vous dire : Joyeux anniversaire !
    Votre goolam.

  41. marie-lucie

    chemist/pharmacist

    Le premier mot est britannique, le second Nord-Américain. Le second a l’avantage de ne pas créer d’ambiguité entre la chimie et la pharmacie, bien qu’il y ait un rapport historique entre ces deux domaines d’activité.

  42. Siganus K.

    Faut-il comprendre que nous avons échappé à l’influence britannique pour nous retrouver sous l’influence américaine ? (Mon Harrap’s (8e édition, 2006) parle aussi de druggist. A ce sujet, j’ai toujours trouvé amusante la confusion qui pouvait exister en anglais entre drug-médicament et drug-drogue.)

  43. Cette "confusion" entre drogue-médicament et drogue-stupéfiant était possible jusqu’à récemment en français. Dans le TLFi on trouve par exemple une citation de Sartre parlant de drogue pour dire médicament. Ce n’est que depuis peu que le sens de drogue-stupéfiant-nocif a supplanté celui de médicament-bénéfique.

    P.S.: il n’est jamais trop tard, dit-on: bon anniversaire, donc!

  44. On trouve à Bruxelles de nombreuses façades ornées de sgrafitto, sortes de fresques murales obtenues par la superposition de plusieurs couches de mortier coloré dans la masse, une technique très présente dans l’architecture Art Nouveau.

  45. Pour drogue, le TLFi parle d’une origine discutée ; pourtant notre dico, pour «droga» (mêmes significations) donne le mot arabe hisp. « hatrúka », litt. verbosité.
    La confussion est aussi en espagnol. Chez nous il y a aussi des «droguerías». Les pharmacies et les pharmaciens («farmacias» et «farmacéuticos») sont aussi nommés «boticas» et «boticarios», tirés du mot grec d’où votre «apothicaire» est emprunté.

  46. >Aquinze
    En plus de l’acception connue de notre « grafito » (Même mot aussi pour le mineral graphite), notre dico parle d’écrit ou dessin fait à la main par les Anciens dans les monuments.

  47. chemist/pharmacist

    à propos de confusion possible, un francophone ne comprendra sans doute pas spontanément qu’un physician est un médecin et non un physicien (qui se dit physicist).

    Il y a, là aussi, un rapport historique, lié à la notion commune de nature (φύσις).

    L’anglais fait en effet la distinction, inexistante en français, entre Physics ("the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the world and universe behave"- source : Wikipedia), et Physic ("the art or science of treatment with drugs or medications, as opposed to surgery" – id.)

    On retrouve toutefois cette idée de "nature" associée à la médecine chez les tenants de la naturopathie (terme qui ne résulterait d’ailleurs pas d’une formation hybride associant le latin natura et le grec πάθος, mais proviendrait de l’anglais nature et path, pour signifier que cette pratique thérapeutique est "le chemin de la nature"…)

  48. >Aquinze
    Pour «físico» notre dico a aussi l’acception ancienne de prof. de médecine, médecin, et on ajoute qu’il est usité en Castilla comme rural. Je ne l’ai lu que dans textes anciens.

  49. marie-lucie

    les mots anglais physics et physic

    Seul le premier a encore cours, pour dire la physique en tant que science. Le second voulait dire à peu près la même chose que "drogue" au sens de "médicament", mais on ne le rencontre que dans des textes du 17e ou 18e siècle. Je ne me souviens pas d’avoir vu ce mot au sens de l’art du médecin, plutôt que du médicament.

    naturopathie (terme qui … proviendrait de l’anglais nature et path, pour signifier que cette pratique thérapeutique est « le chemin de la nature »…)

    Je ne crois pas que cette second origine soit la bonne. En anglais, naturopath est formé par analogie avec osteopath et autres mots en path désignant le praticien de ces thérapeutiques, mots qui correspondent à des mots en pathy désignant la discipline du praticien en question. Ils semblent provenir d’une mauvaise interprétation de la racine grecque path qui se trouve aussi dans pathology et autres mots scientifiques. Je vis en milieu surtout anglophone et je n’ai jamais lu ou entendu qui que ce soit associer la racine grecque avec le mot anglais. Le "chemin de la nature" serait Nature’s path, pas naturopath. Personne ne désignerait une personne d’un nom voulant dire "sentier".

  50. Vous avez raison, Marie-Lucie, mon commentaire était un peu approximatif : j’aurais dû écrire "L’anglais faisait en effet la distinction".

    J’aurais également dû préciser que l’hypothèse de l’étymologie anglaise du mot est défendue par les adeptes de la naturopathie eux-mêmes… voir ici, par exemple :

    http://www.masantenaturelle.com/chroniques/collaborationgb/approche_hygionomiste-1.php

  51. I think that when Macbeth says (V iii) "Throw physic to the dogs; I’ll none of it" he means the science or art of medicine in general, not merely a specific remedy, though the context is admittedly ambiguous:

    MACBETH:
    [...]
    How does your patient, doctor?

    Doctor:
    Not so sick, my lord,
    As she is troubled with thick coming fancies,
    That keep her from her rest.

    MACBETH:
    Cure her of that.
    Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuff’d bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?

    Doctor:
    Therein the patient
    Must minister to himself.

    MACBETH:
    Throw physic to the dogs; I’ll none of it.

    The OED says that although ‘medical remedy’ is the original sense, ‘medical science’ is found in many other languages, including Old Occitan, Old Catalan, Middle Dutch, and Middle High German (though German Physik is now only ‘physics’). The earliest quotations for physic are of the form the craft of physic, which is ambiguous between the two senses, but 1481 Myrrour of Worlde (Caxton) I. xii. 38 "Phisyke..is a mestier or a crafte that entendeth to the helthe of mannes body" is clearly in the latter sense, and 1700 S. L. tr. C. Frick & C. Schweitzer Relation Voy. E.-Indies 4 "Any service suitable to my profession, which was Physick" is even more obviously so.

    As for naturopath(y), the OED agrees with you.

  52. marie-lucie

    Je viens de chercher les articles sur "naturopath(i)e" en français et en anglais et il semble bien que Aquinze et John Cowan aient raison! Mais le mot semble avoir été inventé par un Allemand, pas un anglophone. D’autre part, si on peut se fier à Wikipedia, le mot "osteopathy" existait déjà depuis 1874, tandis que "naturopathy" date de 1895. Il se peut donc fort bien que ce dernier terme ait été formé sur l’exemple du premier, et que son auteur ait été doublement influencé par l’homophonie des deux "paths".

  53. > John
    (+ Nijma)

    BBC website (From Our Own Correspondent), Saturday, 4 June 2011:

    "You can folly some of the people some of the time," said a graffiti message with delightful malapropism on a broken wall inside the Katiba. "But you can’t folly all the people all of the time."

    It’s true however that they’re talking about “a graffiti message”, not just “a graffiti”.

Laisser un commentaire

Entrez vos coordonnées ci-dessous ou cliquez sur une icône pour vous connecter:

Logo WordPress.com

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte WordPress.com. Déconnexion / Changer )

Image Twitter

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Twitter. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Facebook

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Facebook. Déconnexion / Changer )

Photo Google+

Vous commentez à l'aide de votre compte Google+. Déconnexion / Changer )

Connexion à %s